Can Spotify Artists See Who Listens?

By Richard Pryn •  Updated: 10/05/22 •  6 min read

Spotify has recently been at the center of a debate about how much musical data it collects from users who have opted in to the feature. Which begs the question, “Can Spotify Artists See Who Listens?”

Can Spotify Artists See Who Listens?

Spotify’s song promotion algorithm has been the subject of much speculation in the past few years. What exactly is it, and where can you see it if you’re an artist?

This guide will be covering whether Spotify artists do have access to who listens to their content and how they are able to access this information! 

Will Spotify Be Adding In New Features To See Followers?

Even Though these are some of the most desired features, there has been no news of Spotify allowing the artists to view exactly who is liking and following their music or content. 

It does not seem likely because it used to have this feature back in 2013 but was removed that year.

This is because information of the users being benign kept safe at all costs. It allows less issues to occur when less information is put out for people to see and use. 

Is The Artist Notified Of The Following? 

Yes, the artist is always notified when they get more and more followers. However, they will never be notified when people play their song or content.

Notifications would get too hectic if they were to be notified everytime someone played their content and it would jam up the system. 

There is also an area of spotify where people who follow you are able to see what you are listening to on friends feed.

However, there is a way to keep this private. Go to your Desktop App > Preferences > Turn off ‘Publish my activity on Spotify’.

Notified Likes 

The artists will always get notifications like on any social media site about how many likes they are receiving.

However, in this case, they will not get to see who is liking it. Therefore, you are able to keep track of your growing popularity by looking at your increasing followers and likes. 

You do not need to know who is doing this but it could help with the audience. However, it is unlikely that will happen again on Spotify. 

Personal Accounts Vs. Playlists 

With your personal account, you are able to see who follows your accounts which is also very similar to social media platforms like Instagram. However, you cannot see who is following your playlists. 

Therefore, you could use your personal account to target a specific audience and get data from there.

You can easily assume that the people who have taken the time to follow your personal account will also be following your content too! 

How To Increase Your Spotify Followers On Your Playlist 

Sharing your content on social media

Using several different platforms is useful to enhance your following on your personal accounts and spotify playlists.

It gets the word out about your content to different groups of people who share your work and it is the best way to get something around quickly. 

Promotion

promoting your playlist is one of the most important things you can do.

However, you need to be doing this targeting the best audience for your content. You can use forums and groups to help you do this. 

Making Money From Playlists 

Many people want to make a bit of money for their work in Spotify.

You can get banned from the platform if you try to pay people to put your work on their profile or the other way around. This is because it goes against the terms and conditions. 

This has also been put in place because it protects the experience for the people who pay for their Spotify subscriptions. If people could pay for their way into successful playlists, that is all you would be listening to. 

There is also something called SubmitHub where you can pay to have your content listened to for a possible placement. This makes the system flow much easier and more organically. 

Ghost Followers 

There are also such things as ghost followers where you are able to follow someone and their playlist without them being able to see you. 

These are the steps you must follow: 

  1. Go to the action replay that interests you.
  2. Click on the three dots below.
  3. Select Share.
  4. Click link Copy Playlist.
  5. Paste the copied link to the search bar of Spotify.
  6. Press Enter.

When it comes to using Spotify, these are a few things you need to know about information and access.

In modern society, it is important to keep data online secure and protected which is why Spotify removed the access of being able to see everyone who follows playlists etc. 

This guide has been produced to shed some light on the way in which Spotify works in terms of who can see what and what the artists are able to see and what information they can track. 

It is important for artists to know how well they are doing in terms of likes and follows and they can track this by numbers and not individuals.

You must be carrying out promotions for your content regularly and you will see it increase in popularity day by day. However, it is not an immediate process.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can Someone Tell If You Listen To Their Spotify Playlist?

You will not be able to see exactly who is listening to your music, but you will be able to see how many people are liking your content and playlists. You will be able to find this information below the description of your playlist. 

Can You Tell When Someone Views Your Spotify?

No, for reasons concerning protecting the public’s information and data. Spotify removed this from happening.

However, you can see how many people are following your personal account and gauge an audience target.

Richard Pryn

Hey there. I am an award winning composer for movie trailers, including Bladerunner 2049, Diablo II, WandaVision, and loads more. I am the founder of The Trailer Music School where my aim is to teach everything I know about music composition, production, and generally being a functional human being. I podcast, blog, vlog and jog (sometimes). I also love coffee, nachos and self-improvement. I live with my wife, three kids and numerous pets. I am also known by my pseudonym, Richard Schrieber (it’s a long story).

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